Cellular and Mobile Devices

​​​​​​The Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (CWTA) is the authority on wireless issues, developments and trends in Canada. It represents cellular, PCS, messaging, mobile radio, fixed wireless and mobile satellite carriers as well as companies that develop and produce products and services for the industry.

the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (CWTA), along with its members and the Mobile Manufacturers Forum (MMF), have completed the initial development of a new Web site: Wireless Accessibility. The site is designed to both engage and educate users who have questions about what options exist when it comes to the accessibility features of wireless devices in Canada.

Within Wireless Accessibility you will find information about which device features can assist individuals with disabilities related to vision, hearing, speech, cognition and dexterity. There is also a resource section that contains links to both wireless service providers and manufacturers of wireless devices, many of whom have their own accessibility initiatives on their respective Web sites.

Wireless Accessibility incorporates the GARI (Global Accessibility Reporting Initiative) database, an international project developed to help consumers learn more about the various accessibility features of mobile phones. The database allows individuals to identify phones with the features that may assist them with their particular needs. Simply click Find Devices to search for and compare mobile devices available in Canada.

Androids

Getting a new cell phone is a bit like moving into a new place. While you may be generally happy with your decision, there will inevitably be some tweaks and improvements you will make to turn it into your own. Today's Android devices are no exception, and with over 600,000 apps available to download from Google Play, there are a lot of possibilities.

  • A collection of accessible apps for your android device offers some of the most popular and useful apps for your new phone or tablet, including a mix of old standbys and some lesser-known programs for both new and advanced users.

  • Android Access is your portal to information on accessible Android apps and programs for people who are blind or sight-impaired. They're excited to be a part of the Android community, and look forward to your comments, feedback, and submissions. If you're new to Android, check out their Getting Started page. Keep up to date with the latest reviews and news by following @AndroidAccess on Twitter.

  • The How to be Blind's accessible apps for android devices is where you can find the list of most of the apps and services they've covered on the HTB2 blog and podcast. Some of the apps they’ve covered are no longer accessible so they are not included. They know they are far from having a complete and comprehensive list of every accessible app but they only post what they’ve covered.

    The apps are broken into categories by device then listed in alphabetical order with a short description of what the app does. The embedded links will take you to the US iTunes website to view the full details of the app or strait to the website of the developer.

iPads, iPhones & iPods

  • Accessibility features in iOS 7 .

  • Through his monthly pod casts, Corey Ballard walks iDevice users through a number of accessible applications with his All with my iPhone audio tutorials. Corey provides pod cast tutorials for many of the applications which are available through some of the links that follow.

  • Justin Romack provides a very positive, detailed blog account regarding Amazon’s Kindle for iOS Updated with Accessibility.

  • It has been said that technology has made the world smaller, but for people who are blind or sight-impaired, iDevices are opening up a whole new world. Accessible apps for iPhone and iPad users who are blind or sight-impaired highlights some of the most innovative and entertaining apps available to people with vision loss. Now, with the aid of an iPhone or iPad, people who are blind or sight-impaired can virtually see color, light, paper money and much more. As this list is constantly being updated, be on the lookout for new additions to their AppList.

  • Accessible games for the iPhone or iPad offers a variety of games that are fully accessible using Apple's Voice-Over feature.

  • AppleVis is a community-powered website for users of Apple's range of Mac computers, the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch who are blind or sight-impaired. AppleVis is a rich resource that strives to empower the community by offering multiple pathways to access and share relevant and useful information. As members of the blind community, they seek to encourage and support people in exploring the many ways in which these mainstream products and related applications can offer opportunities to people with vision loss for personal enrichment, independence and empowerment.

    mechanisms for raising awareness of the accessibility of Apple products and related applications, and for promoting further advancement in accessibility.

  • Apple iPhone users guide describes the features of iOS 7, and of iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, iPhone 5c, and iPhone 5s.

  • iPhone and iPod Touch users who have purchased an Apple wireless keyboard to use in conjunction with their Mac device may find the list of blue tooth keyboard commands and touch screen gestures to be helpful.

  • The How to be Blind's accessible apps for i-devices is where you can find the list of most of the apps and services they've covered on the HTB2 blog and podcast. Some of the apps they’ve covered are no longer accessible so they are not included. They know they are far from having a complete and comprehensive list of every accessible app but they only post what they’ve covered.

    The apps are broken into categories by device then listed in alphabetical order with a short description of what the app does. The embedded links will take you to the US iTunes website to view the full details of the app or strait to the website of the developer.

  • The iBlindTech site is dedicated to helping you get the most out of your iPod, iPhone or iPad. You'll find audio demos to help with some of the most frequently asked questions and app reviews to get the most from your iDevice.

    Apple have made the range of IOS devices accessible out of the box. One way they have done this is with the built in screen reader Voice Over. Voice Over has been included with all IOS devices since iPhone 3GS. It has been making the iProducts a pleasure to use for many people who are blind and sight-impaired ever since.

  • For a list of compatible wireless Braille displays for Apple iDevices

  • Users of the revolutionary new iPhone will find these iPhone "How to..." step-by-step on-line tutorials quite helpful.

  • Using iPhone with Voiceover includes a general overview of the iPhone's "VoiceOver", operating gestures and rotary controls.

  • Freedom Scientific's audio tutorials on accessing iTunes with JAWS - Part 1 provides a step-by-step overview and tutorial on how to set up and navigate iTunes 10.1 with JAWS Version 12, the first in a two part series hosted by Jonathan Moser. Although iTunes is updated frequently, the basic architecture of this app remains the same so these tutorials will be very helpful, even for later versions. Freedom Scientific's audio tutorials on accessing iTunes with JAWS - Part 2 is the second in this two part series hosted by Jonathan Moser.

  • Triple Click Home addresses accessibility for iEverything including some interesting news regarding inner events within the Apple Corporation.

Other 

  • Accessible Cell Phones for People who are Blind or Sight-Impaired is a site that gives general information about cell phone options to help people make choices. This site has rather dated information that has not been addressed in some time. However, much of its content makes for a good read and provides an overview of the many various methods that once existed to make cellular products accessible.

  • Accessible Phones is a premier resource for information on cellular phones which are fully or somewhat accessible to people who are blind, sight impaired, or print-disabled. Some phones include built-in accessibility features while others work with specialized software which makes the phone talk.


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